Wasatch History

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bsmoot
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Re: Wasatch History

Postby bsmoot » Mon Jul 13, 2009 11:37 pm

Back in 1965, 5.10 was almost unheard of, since 5.9 was the hardest grade, young up & comers like Lowe & McQuarrie just gave the Dorsal the highest current grade. Personally, I think they climbed 11a, given the shoes they were wearing...way ahead of their time.

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Shaft
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Re: Wasatch History

Postby Shaft » Tue Jul 14, 2009 9:30 am

BackClip wrote:go to your toolbar at the top and click zoom.


It's still fairly unreadable for me, and my vision is good. Good web design is about making things readable, I can't zoom my browser out enough under Linux or Windows. AB, what is the justification for using flash to render the text? So nobody can copy/paste?

Flash - making things suck since '99.
boissal wrote:"MEMORY DAB, REFUSING TO ACCEPT DEFEAT DAB, NOT SENDING THE RIGHT PROBLEM DAB, AAAAAAAAAAGGGGGHHH DAB."

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Re: Wasatch History

Postby steveoh » Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:27 am

super cool.

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samg
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Re: Wasatch History

Postby samg » Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:56 pm

Shaft wrote:
BackClip wrote:go to your toolbar at the top and click zoom.


It's still fairly unreadable for me, and my vision is good. Good web design is about making things readable, I can't zoom my browser out enough under Linux or Windows. AB, what is the justification for using flash to render the text? So nobody can copy/paste?

Flash - making things suck since '99.


+1, Mac/Safari.

Would like to read it without eye discomfort at some point though!

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Re: Wasatch History

Postby SLunt » Mon Aug 31, 2009 8:47 pm

Wow. Stumbled on this site when I should have been working. It's great to read all of these stories. I absolutely loved Desperate Grace, though Smith's book was more thorough. I would spend hours thumbing through those books, planning ascents.

Here are a few anecdotes for whatever they're worth.

In the summer of 1977, when I was 14, I took Timberline's Basic Rock Climbing class. My parents dropped me off at the mouth of LCC (to this day I still can't believe my mother supported this idea) to meet up with the instructor (Mark Freed?) and other students. A man called over to me from a big blue GMC pickup truck, and asked if I was in the class. It was his first climbing lesson as well and he invited me to wait with him. The inside of the cab was plastered with photos of mountains torn from magazines. The guy had long dark hair, a cowboy's mustache and he literally bounced with enthusiasm as he pointed to the photos and shared his love for the mountains. I immediately liked him and we became belay partners for the day. He was the only student to make it to the top of the hardest problem we toproped that day (@5.8). His energy was incredible, even when he was incorrectly helping coil ropes (elbow to fist like an electrician). What really stood out, besides his natural ability, was his friendliness and positive encouragement to me and everyone else in the class. So it was really no surprise that when I ran into Merrill Bitter a year or so later, he had just on-sited Mind Blow while my brother Dave and I were rejoicing in our ascent of Tingey's Terror. He was still just as friendly and encouraging even though he had become a much better climber than me by light years.

Another time, in 1980 I think, Dave and I were in the process of backing off of Equipment Overhang Right. Les Ellison had led us up this awhile before (with a broken hand from a climb in the Fisher Towers) and we thought we'd have no problem. Apparently we did, and we were going to lose some gear because of it. Along came two guys about our ages who offered to help. They were friendly and funny, and Bret Ruckman, in an almost self-deprecating manner, led the pitch while Gary Olsen belayed, and our two new friends saved the day.

One day, when I was about 16, I was hanging out at the Gate Boulders when this rosy-faced teen approached me and asked if I wanted to climb. He wanted to do Half-a-Finger, which I had never done and wasn't sure he could either. I mean how could he, he was so young! (My age as it turned out). Bryce Thatcher, who went on to a speed ascent record on the Grand Teton, cruised the pitch, placing a Friend just below the crux. Well, I had only seen one Friend before, and that was at Doug Hansen's house in American Fork. I had no idea how they worked and struggled to remove it. Burned out, I flailed on the crux, dangling on the rope while I swear I could hear Bryce losing his patience breath-by-breath.

Those were definitely formative years!

Scott Lunt

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Re: Wasatch History

Postby Skyman » Wed Sep 02, 2009 3:54 pm

SLunt wrote:Wow. Stumbled on this site when I should have been working. It's great to read all of these stories. I absolutely loved Desperate Grace, though Smith's book was more thorough. I would spend hours thumbing through those books, planning ascents.

Here are a few anecdotes for whatever they're worth.

In the summer of 1977, when I was 14, I took Timberline's Basic Rock Climbing class. My parents dropped me off at the mouth of LCC (to this day I still can't believe my mother supported this idea) to meet up with the instructor (Mark Freed?) and other students. A man called over to me from a big blue GMC pickup truck, and asked if I was in the class. It was his first climbing lesson as well and he invited me to wait with him. The inside of the cab was plastered with photos of mountains torn from magazines. The guy had long dark hair, a cowboy's mustache and he literally bounced with enthusiasm as he pointed to the photos and shared his love for the mountains. I immediately liked him and we became belay partners for the day. He was the only student to make it to the top of the hardest problem we toproped that day (@5.8). His energy was incredible, even when he was incorrectly helping coil ropes (elbow to fist like an electrician). What really stood out, besides his natural ability, was his friendliness and positive encouragement to me and everyone else in the class. So it was really no surprise that when I ran into Merrill Bitter a year or so later, he had just on-sited Mind Blow while my brother Dave and I were rejoicing in our ascent of Tingey's Terror. He was still just as friendly and encouraging even though he had become a much better climber than me by light years.

Another time, in 1980 I think, Dave and I were in the process of backing off of Equipment Overhang Right. Les Ellison had led us up this awhile before (with a broken hand from a climb in the Fisher Towers) and we thought we'd have no problem. Apparently we did, and we were going to lose some gear because of it. Along came two guys about our ages who offered to help. They were friendly and funny, and Bret Ruckman, in an almost self-deprecating manner, led the pitch while Gary Olsen belayed, and our two new friends saved the day.

One day, when I was about 16, I was hanging out at the Gate Boulders when this rosy-faced teen approached me and asked if I wanted to climb. He wanted to do Half-a-Finger, which I had never done and wasn't sure he could either. I mean how could he, he was so young! (My age as it turned out). Bryce Thatcher, who went on to a speed ascent record on the Grand Teton, cruised the pitch, placing a Friend just below the crux. Well, I had only seen one Friend before, and that was at Doug Hansen's house in American Fork. I had no idea how they worked and struggled to remove it. Burned out, I flailed on the crux, dangling on the rope while I swear I could hear Bryce losing his patience breath-by-breath.

Those were definitely formative years!

Scott Lunt


Scott, wow, good to hear from you. Cary says you contacted him on Facebook. Ever get up to SLC? It's been a while since I've been to Tucson. We need to chat.

Kyle

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Re: Wasatch History

Postby SLunt » Thu Sep 03, 2009 9:02 pm

Hey Kyle!

Good to hear from you. Hope all is well with you and the family.

Yes, I connected with Cary on Facebook. Where's your profile dude? (Hehehehe!)

We are planning on being in SLC Nov. 5-9th. Would love to meet up for a beer or lunch or something. Can I reach you at TW? I'm at slunt(at)cox.net.

Scott

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Re: Wasatch History

Postby Skyman » Fri Sep 04, 2009 8:58 am

SLunt wrote:Hey Kyle!

Good to hear from you. Hope all is well with you and the family.

Yes, I connected with Cary on Facebook. Where's your profile dude? (Hehehehe!)

We are planning on being in SLC Nov. 5-9th. Would love to meet up for a beer or lunch or something. Can I reach you at TW? I'm at slunt(at)cox.net.

Scott


My Wife is the facebook queen. I'm still fighting it. I'm always in for a beer. And, yes, unfortunately still at TW. Mobile # 801 633 5133.

Kyle []P []P []P

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jun
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Re: Wasatch History

Postby jun » Fri Sep 04, 2009 9:40 am

Hey everyone, these stories are fantastic and we have all been enjoying them for a few years now.

I have recently started working with Jeff at Momentum on a new project. In the cafe adjoining the gym there is a lot of wall space and shelves that are open. Jeff decided a while ago that he wanted to turn this space into a sort of local climbing history museum of sorts. Knowing his plans I offered to pull information, stories, photos and more together to put on display.

With your approval, I would like to use many of the stories listed on this thread and on the Old Schoolers thread to display publicly in the gym. Since this is the internet and this is a public site I'm sure I could just steal the stories and format them on a nice sheet of paper. But what I'd rather do is A)get your approval to do so; B)have you rewrite the story the way you'd like it to be told, with associated credits to climbers, etc; and C) most importantly, I really really would like/need pictures to go along with the stories. They don't have to be photos taken the day of the FA or anything like that, but some oldschool photos of the climbers in any way would be helpful.

So, if you want to participate (and who wouldn't) please contact me directly at craig.lloyd@gmail.com. I want your stories, your photos, and your approval. I would love to eventually take it a step further, with signed printed stories and photos, possible 'coffee and chat' sessions where you'd come into the gym and tell old stories to jaw-dropping spectators, such as myself, and more, but one step at a time.

Any takers? I need to really get moving on this. Most of you know me and those who don't can contact Shaft, he'll vouch for me. I love climbing and the history of it, especially our local stuff. I just want to share it with everyone.

craig
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Shaft
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Re: Wasatch History

Postby Shaft » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:29 am

Jun, I am sure you remember but in case you don't, many stories are available at the University of Utah's American West Center - http://www.hum.utah.edu/amwest/?pageId=2091. Some info in this post:
http://www.saltlakeclimbers.org/node/428
boissal wrote:"MEMORY DAB, REFUSING TO ACCEPT DEFEAT DAB, NOT SENDING THE RIGHT PROBLEM DAB, AAAAAAAAAAGGGGGHHH DAB."

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trashman
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Re: Wasatch History

Postby trashman » Sun Apr 25, 2010 10:37 am

not quite inspired by the Wasatch, but i'm sure it will lead back here.

after rapping down the Jim Langdon's Route on Bottleneck peak yesterday, i'm curious about his story. FA of that, solo no less, in 1973(pre friends on baggy fists?), and FFA of Regge Pole with Jeff Lowe is all i've been able to find.

any one have any stories?
Last edited by trashman on Mon Apr 26, 2010 5:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

bsmoot
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Re: Wasatch History

Postby bsmoot » Mon Apr 26, 2010 8:03 am

Met Jim a few times, he was a nice guy...always excited to get out and climb...reminded me of Bill Forrest, big glasses kinda tall and lanky. He is a great aid climber. In the late 70's, he and Mark Ward climbed the Dihedral Wall on El Cap (pre cams) in only 3 days.
Last edited by bsmoot on Fri Sep 03, 2010 7:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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trashman
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Re: Wasatch History

Postby trashman » Mon Apr 26, 2010 5:53 pm

the aid skills for his time are what got me. looking at those long, wide sustained corners w/ out cams must have been daunting. the crux overhang on bottleneck looks improbable as well, either extreme faith in hexes, or insecure tubes or bongs must have been necassary. :shock:

i get scared enough with my aluminum courage.

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Re: Wasatch History

Postby bsmoot » Fri Sep 03, 2010 12:07 am

Image

This is a photo of Lynn at the crux on Hyperform, Lone Peak

I got to climb with "wheels" quite a bit, back in the 70's & 80's. He was a strong climber and boulderer. He loved crack climbing. Much time was spent in the desert. Lynn was an early ice climber...back when it was hard to find drooped picks. He had some great first ascents in Indian Creek, Zion and of course the Wasatch. I remember working on a steep, thin fingercrack with him, called Aggression. Neither of us could quite get it. We both thought rock slippers should be invented. A few days later he sent it. In the mid 70's he climbed all 4 pitches of the Black Peeler with Dennis Turville...I think they had to bivy....burrrr!

When he would call me to go climbing he would say "Brian....this is Lynn" then total silence. I would have to carry on the conversation from then on. I felt a little sorry for him because he was so quiet on the phone. In person, I found him more out going and more like Lynn. I remember how psyched he was when he sent a boulder problem that no one had done before.

Lynn was very quiet, socially awkward, a bit slow of speech and very unassuming, he would climb with anyone... he had many climbing partners, but no one regular. He never said anything bad about anyone. He was a patient, excellent climbing partner. There was a quiet determination about Lynn, which got him up many a hard climb and gained him much respect from the climbing community. Although he kept to himself mostly, he was always fun and pleasant to climb with. On rare occasions, you could get a glimpse of some dry humor. Once we climbed the Dorsal together...he made it look easy. The last time I climbed with Lynn was in the early 90's on the Snowbird Climbing wall, where we took turns belaying each other over that big roof...he seemed really happy. Sadly, Lynn must have had some issues with depression that became too much for him. Several years later he took his life. I have great memories of Lynn, I miss him alot...long live "Wheels".

Image
Last edited by bsmoot on Mon Sep 04, 2017 11:36 am, edited 4 times in total.

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Kifua Kikubwa
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Re: Wasatch History

Postby Kifua Kikubwa » Fri Sep 03, 2010 3:08 am

Awesome photo! I sure dig on the way it used to be. I feel that we all stand on the shoulder of giants. Ahh, I long for the days before internet, cell phones, and other "advanced" technology. Thanks for the history.


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